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A version of this piece was originally written for and published on Kiplinger

There is no shortage of great content available for those who want to build a sound retirement plan, from books and podcasts to hiring your own personal financial advisor to optimize your planning efforts.

While the amount of information out there can be overwhelming, the benefit of such volume is that you’re less likely today than ever before to leave something critical out of your retirement planning, or to forget something altogether…but there is one big exception to that.

And this factor that you may be at the most risk of forgetting has nothing to do with your finances. …


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This post was originally written for & published on Beyond Your Hammock

Unless you’ve been living on Pluto for the last few months, you know there’s a big election just weeks away in the U.S.

And investors want to know: what does the outcome of that election that mean for the economy?

Perhaps more importantly, what does it mean for your investment portfolio? Should you think about changing your investment strategy now?

Short answer: probably not.

It might seem surprising given the volatility we expect to see in the market because of the election. …


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This article was originally written for & published on Business Insider

If you’ve ever spoken with a financial advisor — or even looked into a robo-advisor, for that matter — to learn more about investing money, then you’ve probably heard of “risk tolerance” or taken a risk-tolerance questionnaire.

The higher your tolerance, conventional wisdom says, the more risk you can take with your investments. The lower your tolerance, the more conservative you may want to be with your portfolio.

But your risk tolerance is only a measure of your emotional capacity to take risks. It tells us nothing about your actual ability to afford to realize them. …


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This article was originally written for & published on Forbes

Most of us know it’s important to save, and understand saving money for the future is a critical action step to achieving goals, being able to retire, and building assets.

But things quickly go from the very obvious to rather uncertain when you start talking about how much you need to save each month.

Determining how much you need to save to meet your goals and enjoy financial security is difficult because rules of thumb can only get you so far. …


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This piece was originally written for and published on Business Insider.

Getting life insurance is not on most people’s priority lists. It can feel like a hassle to go through the process of scheduling an exam and sharing your medical history.

The reality, however, is that life insurance can be a useful part of your overall plan to make sure your assets, your property, and the financial security of your loved ones can withstand the worst-case scenario of your sudden death.

This is especially true if you have minor children or dependents. In general, you may not need life insurance until you have someone who is financially dependent on you, because life insurance is designed to protect those individuals from financial hardship if you (and your income) were no longer here. …


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This article was originally written for an published on Kiplinger

Plans have a tendency to become outdated the moment they’re set down on paper. Once you have a financial plan, don’t let it get stale. You’ll want to review your plan often, even when things in your life don’t seem hectic or eventful — in fact, I’d argue that those are the best times to sit down, give your full attention to your finances, and do a thorough review.

But aside from that, there are other specific triggers in life that tell you it’s time to take a look at your plan, get reacquainted with it, and potentially make changes. …


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This article was originally written for and published on Beyond Your Hammock

The other day, my wife, Kali, mentioned she wanted to thank me for something.

We recently bought a home we both love in upstate New York. It sits on a little mountain and has an incredible, western-facing view.

We were sitting on the deck watching a gorgeous sunset (an activity we don’t imagine tiring of anytime soon), when she said this, and added that it was a bit of a long story to explain.

She said that earlier that day, she was looking out the bedroom window and had a flashback to a time we went to a summer barbecue at a house on Cape Cod. …


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This piece was originally written & published on Beyond Your Hammock

My wife and I rarely do anything in what could be described as “the usual way.”

We think outside the box and generally choose to forge our own path instead of following the well-known and mainstream; from the fact that we’re both extremely independent and prefer to work for ourselves to choosing to rent in the city when most everyone else seems to be buying…

…to eventually deciding to skip the whole starter-home idea and go straight for the dream, vacation home when we did decide to buy.

The thought process we used to settle on the idea to buy a vacation home (while continuing to rent our primary residence in Boston) was intensive, and it required a massive amount of financial planning work to get both of us on the same page and in agreement with what worked best. …


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A version of this article was written for and published on Business Insider

Buying your first home can be a stressful-enough process in the best of times. But doing it during a global pandemic? Talk about an extra layer of complexity.

That, however, is exactly what my wife and I did earlier this year.

To be fair, we started the home-buying process before COVID-19 rampaged through the country in the spring of 2020. We began planning a year or two earlier, and started to actually look for homes in the fall of 2019.

We put in an offer on the property we wanted to buy in mid-January. Due to a number of factors, including the sudden shuttering of all businesses and offices (including our closing attorney’s), we didn’t close until May 13th. …


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This article was originally written for and published on Kiplinger

Equity compensation can be an extremely useful tool when it comes to building wealth. And just like any other tool you may use, you can learn how to leverage it to build something great — or you can mishandle it and end up with a poor outcome.

Some employers offer equity compensation in addition to regular paychecks or bonuses as part of the total compensation package for key, valuable employees. …

About

Eric Roberge

#FinancialPlanner helping 30 & 40-somethings build #wealth & think differently about #money • Top #FinancialAdvisor in #Boston • www.BeyondYourHammock.com

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